Fashion Design Sketches

The intense competition in the fashion industry makes it important for any fashion designer to showcase the designs to a larger audience. This can be done by creating fashion sketches and displaying them on the Internet. The sketches give an insight to the fashion fraternity and also to the common audience on the concept behind a particular fashion design. It is a way of communicating the theme to the people associated with the apparel industry. Hence, they are extremely important for any fashion designer.

Fashion sketches are illustrations made by professional artists and designed in a way that they can be easily displayed on the Internet. They portray the true creative genius of the designer. These can be considered a blue print of the final product. The perfection in making sketches is a prerequisite as they serve as the main marketing tool of the fashion professionals. The sketches reflect trends and the value added features of the design. They can also be used to evaluate the various patters used by different designers.

Fashion sketches are important, since they are the preliminary designs that have to be taken to the different apparel manufacturers in the market. The sketches are then used to select the different fabric samples from the wide range on offer.

Computers are increasingly being used for the purpose of making fashion design sketches. Several software are now available that assist the designers in making the drawings. While some still prefer the traditional hand-drawn sketches, others choose to opt for the speed and convenience of computer-aided designing. Hand-drawn sketches can also be fed into the computer with the help of a scanner.

The art of making fashion design sketches is important for creating a niche in the highly competitive fashion industry. Fashion designers can make their presence felt only if their sketches are different and original. Good quality sketches are the only means of establishing a firm foothold in the fashion industry.

London Fashion Shows

You have often heard one say, “A man is known by the company he keeps”. However it seems these days that a person is more likely to be known by the attire he/she wears. It is considered, that the biggest mistake a person can ever commit is a fashion faux pas. One thing that is inevitable in the fashion world is change. We are consistently being presented with various advertisement gigs that portray what famous celebrities are wearing and this has a direct impact on our lives. While shopping for clothes, a typical teenager would often say, “I want a dress that resembles what Bono was wearing in his latest music video”. Today, fashion dictates our lives and what we wear. Whether it is at a party or at work, we want our dress to reflect our taste and attitude. On other occasions, we are keener on making a personal style statement.

No lucid citation can be made regarding the advent of the London fashion culture. It dates back to the period during the Hippie culture which was originally a youth movement that began in the United States. It started during the 1960s and spread all over the world. This was probably one of the first major fashion influence that the world had witnessed. Hippie fashions and values had a profound impact on global culture and influenced major areas such as television, film and popular music. One such example was the use of homemade tie-dyed t-shirts that had become very popular.

The end of the Second World War had some more revolutionary fashion changes in store.During the 1930s, actresses Katharine Hepburn and Marlene Dietrich were often photographed wearing trousers and this made trousers more acceptable for women.By the end of the war, women had experienced a sense of independence, were experiencing their own individuality and were more liberalized. This allowed the women to fight for their rights and influenced a change in what they started to wear. Gradually, this had an impact on the women of London. They became wary of the fashion culture and became susceptible to change in what they wore.

During the early to mid 1970s, “Punk” originated as a style in London from the designer Vivienne Westwood and her partner Malcolm McLaren. Nonconformist and postmodernist in its nature and essence, this resulted from the economic depression that was prevalent during this period in London.

When it comes to fashion, London is one of the fashion capitals of the world. The others being Milan, Paris and New York City. London now hosts a plethora of London Fashion Events with the London Fashion Week event being most popular. A bi-annual event, the London Fashion Week now forms part of one of London’s leading events attracting a target audience comprising of eminent fashion personalities, retailers and press. The London Fashion Week is held several months in advance of the season so that the press and the prospective buyers are given a chance to preview the fashion designs in advance, for the subsequent season. The governing body for fashion in London is the British Fashion Council or the BFC.

A lot of other London Events remain associated with London Fashion Events and they are London Social Events, London Art Events and London shows.

Simple formal wear are now a passé. Even for common masses, sophistication is the key to perfect dressing, whether the occasion is formal or informal. However, a pair of well-fitted jeans is least likely to fall out of fashion. Jeans are trousers made from denim, and they became quite popular with the teenagers starting in the 1950s and remain in vogue till date.

Green Fashion Designer

The new millennium marked significant changes and twists in people’s lifestyle and preference especially in fashion and trend. In this vital industry, one very relevant breakthrough is the incorporation of environmental awareness and protection in most clothing lines in the fashion business and it has definitely inspired innumerable designers and students of fashion schools to adapt the concept of fashion with a conscience in their masterpieces. Nowadays and in the coming years, career opportunities are opening its thresholds to green fashion designers to make a pivotal difference in the clothing realm as well as promoting eco-friendly merchandises.

The career outlook for a green fashion designer is good. They make on average $42-$87 thousand a year.

Many venues of fashion and clothing are having endless modeling shows and advertisements glorifying the ingenuity of the crafts of green fashion designers and their endeavors are definitely successful. What is a green fashion designer?

The name itself implies that incredible combination of the green ideals with the world of fashion resulting to a revolutionary career or professional perfectly known as green fashion designer. Young artists in this field are making use of natural resources such as bamboos, organic cottons or other similar fibers in their series of clothesline or collections. Most importantly, this is a trend that has not only started in small-scale businesses but has likewise invaded big and known enterprises in the milieu.

Green fashion design concept is actually not a new and fresh perspective since many fashion designers have already adapted this style or concept especially those in agricultural countries. However, the good thing that happened in this particular trend is that many fashion icons and big companies are collaborating together in order to promote and advocate clothes which are eco-friendly in style and content. How do you become a green fashion designer?

Another salient difference in the trend now is that most fashion schools that train and educate potential fashion designers are including the green concept into their very own curriculum. Thus, for those who aim to succeed and establish a promising career as a green fashion designer, an internship program is very necessary to jump start their pursuit. Most key figures in the fashion world would attest to the importance of getting into an internship first before finally plunging into the deep. This is likewise necessary for green fashion designers where they could add more knowledge and experience to their crafts especially in making use of natural resources for their clothes. Thus aside from the conventional degrees and courses you will gain from studying in accredited fashion schools, it is necessary to add more creativity and resourcefulness in finding the right material for your green collection.

People are not always indifferent in new changes and innovations especially if it benefits the world and the ailing nature. For people and aspiring candidates to become green fashion designers, the passion for their craft and awareness and love of nature are two salient components that would definitely lead them to their fulfillment in their crafts.

Thinking of Becoming a Fashion Designer? Then Take a Look at This Fashion Designer Training Guide

Are you obsessed with fashion? Do you spend more time designing clothes than watching television or hanging out with your friends? Do you enjoy reading and looking at fashion magazines more than you enjoy reading best seller books? If you answer yes to one or more of this question then you are destined to become a fashion designer. If you want to be like the famous Yves Saint Laurent, then this training guide will get you started.

Before you start reading the training guide, it is important to keep in mind that there are various professions in the fashion world. Some of the professions include supervising a design team or producing a label under your own name. Whatever the profession you decide to take as a fashion designer you can be sure of two things, you need a lot of dedication, time, and you need to be prepare to earn a low income in the first years of your career as a fashion designer. Now that you know this information, let’s take a look at that fashion designer training guide.

• Getting Started – The first things you need to do to become a fashion designer is search for good and if possible, prestigious fashion school. Once you have taken this first step, you need to think on how you want to start your life as a fashion designer. Do you want to join a fashion company, open your own store, of test your luck and make your own clothing brand?

• Applying to a School- There are a lot of colleges you can attend to become a fashion designer, but the trick is applying to a prestigious college that will push start your career. However, getting into a college with a reputation can be quite hard because they are very picky and selective. Therefore you need to work on your drawing abilities and create a portfolio that is not only impressive but also shows your passion and dedication to fashion.

• Entering School- Once you are in school you will study drawing, color composition and form, pattern making, draping and cutting techniques. To become a fashion designer you will attend school for three/four years. During this time you will be able to win awards/grants, and at the end of each semester you will have an opportunity to show your growth by attending a fashion show held in school. (It will be a good idea to add business classes to your school curriculum as well.)

• Understanding the Fashion World- In order for you to be a successful individual in the fashion world you need to know more than just designing and making clothes. You also need to have a basic knowledge in business, which means you need to know how to negotiate a contract and how to choose a business partner. The fashion world is always changing, hence, you need to keep yourself inform of everything involving fashion and business.

Now that you have taken a look at this fashion designer training guide you are ready to take the fist steps to becoming a famous designer like Hussein Chalayan, Donna Karan, or Michael Kors.

Fashion Week Begins! How to Start a Career in Fashion

For all you fashionistas out there, this is the week you’ve long been waiting for. New York Fashion week kicked off on September 9 at Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park, with the entire fashion world holding its breath to see what clothes we’ll be wearing in Spring 2011.

The final products you’ll see over the next few days are the result of months of hard work and collaboration between a variety of players in the fashion industry. From the designers who make the clothes, to the models who wear them, to the stylists who use them for celebrity clients, everyone has a role in bringing the newest styles to the public eye.

If one of these jobs sounds like your dream career, now might be the time to consider a career in fashion. Whether you’re watching coverage of the shows online, or you’re lucky enough to be attending, there are a variety of careers you can consider as you watch the latest looks roll down the runway.

It all starts here…
Fashion Designer Careers
Days, weeks and months before Fashion Week begins, fashion designers begin sketching, planning, and designing clothes for upcoming seasons. With an extensive knowledge of fashion history, designers combine past trends, beautiful fabrics, and their vision of the future to create wearable works of art. The clothes they display on the runway eventually influence what we wear to work, to school, and even to the beach.

On the runway…
Modeling Careers
It’s not enough for clothes to look beautiful on the rack-NY Fashion Show attendees need to see how clothes move, hang and appear when they’re worn by real live human beings. That’s where fashion models come in. Although their jobs might appear easy on the outside, professional models have to cultivate their look, walk and attitude to help designers showcase their creations and make them appealing to stylists, editors, and merchandisers.

In the audience…
Fashion Stylist Careers
At Fashion Week, celebrities, style editors, and fashion stylists alike are in the audience to preview next season’s looks and trends. Attendance is extremely important for anyone in the styling world, as it gives them a chance to scout outfits for their clients, network with designers and other fashion insiders, and stay up-to-date on the hottest new designs.

From the runway to your closet…
Fashion Buyer & Merchandising Careers
As the hottest new looks are unveiled, fashion buyers and merchandisers get to work, deciding which designs and styles are right for their customers. Whether they work in large department stores or small, exclusive boutiques, fashion buyers and merchandisers are in charge of monitoring and predicting trends, deciding how much merchandise to order, and keeping an eye out for hot new items.

Ready to get started?
In addition to a passion for fashion, all of the careers listed above require an extensive knowledge of design principles, fabric and textiles, and fashion history. A fashion design degree can be a great place to start.

Fashion Games: Perfect for Girls

You can do many things and think of numerous ideas with fashion dress up games for girls. It is perfect for young girls who want to play and learn about fashion.

Barbie fashion games are one of the top favorites when it comes to fashion games. Young girls who still play Barbie will surely enjoy this kind of game because they can do lot of stuffs here. The best part of this game is they can have their own clothing design after getting materials needed and drawing the plan. Always keep in mind that when you are letting young girls play this fashion game, remind them to be careful in using scissors or better if you assist them when playing. Young child should not be allowed to handle sharp things for accidents may happen.

You can also have a Barbie fashion game that allows young girls to choose the best outfit for their Barbie. This game can be played by dressing the Barbie dolls from top to bottom and choosing the clothes that will fit well for the dolls. Accessories are also included and they can choose what they want to use with their dolls. This kind of game is suited for young girls who dreams of entering fashion world in the near future. This will enhance their imagination and ability to make good design when it comes to fashion.

Older girls can enjoy playing this game by dressing up dolls that look exactly like their most admired celebrities. They can search for the fashion design or fashion dress worn by their favorite celebrity through the net or they can buy fashion magazines and use it as a basis. You can even make it more fun and enjoyable by showing them a dress and let them make a guess who designed those outfits. They should be able to familiarize themselves about different style and the designer who made it. This will help them learn more about fashion world. Use the latest magazines and different models to make it more amusing.

You can use many magazines and surf the internet to look for great dress up fashion games. Search for numerous sites and look for something that can give you the best games and ideas for fashion. You can see thousands of these games in the internet with many great ideas for young girls, there are many available games for girls with different ages that can help them learn more when it comes to fashion. This fashion dress up game is one of the best training grounds for children who want to become a great designer someday because this can engage them in fashion at an early age and it is also good for little girls who just want to play as it will enhance their imagination. Girls will surely have fun with this fashion games. If you are hosting children’s party then this game will make them excited and they will all love it. You don’t have to buy expensive materials and it will not cost you big amounts.

Why Use A Fashion Mall Today?

A fashion mall can be a good place to go for that fashion face lift that you have been yearning for. Being a more fashion inclined shopping center; you can find all sorts of fashion products from clothing, to shoes, accessories and jewelry. These malls are very ideal for the choosy shopper who wants to keep up with the latest trends in the market. Unfortunately, this skewed outlook towards fashion makes most of the stores and shops within these malls quite expensive. Unlike getting your cloths and other fashion wear from an ordinary shopping mall, you end up paying a little more handsomely here.

Most fashion based malls are structured in to departments. In each department, you will find a set of related products shops and stores. For instance, you may find several jewel shops tucked in to one area within the mall. This is quite advantageous to the shopper because besides being able to compare similar products in fashion, you also easily compare prices of the same product from different outlets. Some popular departments in such malls include accessories, beauty, kids, tall and plus sizes, teen, men wear, shoes, women, house and home, and jewelry departments among others. As obviously implied, each of these departments will have shops offering specific kinds of products suited for a specific group of people.

Another advantageous feature about fashion malls is that you can easily shop for brands. Since they are structured in to departments, you can be able to go to a specific department, and then narrow down your choice of what you want to buy by the brand name. For instance, if you want to buy some sports shoes for your kids, you would ideally enter in to the kids department section of the mall, then identify the shops therein that sell kids shoes. Then in this small number of shops, you identify the one that specifically sells your ideal brand of shoes, say for example, Nike. This saves you a lot of time moving around looking for the branded items that you desire.

For the person who loves privacy, these fashion malls are also very ideal. Due to the expensive nature of the products being sold in them, most people keep off, preferring to go to the ordinary shopping malls for their shopping needs. As a result, there is limited traffic to these high end shopping centers. You can therefore, shop with your privacy and convenience being at peak. This is also true for the person who feels refined and a person who values high fashion, unique items and values social status and class. Shopping in fashion malls leaves you with that feeling of importance and wealth. After all, you can afford to shop where most other people cannot even afford to go. You can even go ahead and brag a little about your shopping escapades to your friends just to get the kicks out of it.

All said, not all fashion malls are the same. Some will emphasize on fashion and trend items, but others will only use the name for the sake of attracting clients and customers. Some of these fashion shopping centers will even go to the lengths of hosting regular fashion shows just to entice potential customers to visit them. The bottom line is that you should do your due diligence, find out if the fashion mall offers what you need, and look in to cost affordability depending on your financial status.

The Four Fashion Capitals of the World

As with many things, location is a key factor in the success or failure of a model. Proximity to jobs means you can get there faster and cheaper, and in the fast moving fashion industry, quick turnaround is often a deal breaker. You should always put yourself where the action is. As a general rule, big cities offer many more opportunities than smaller places, as the clients and agencies are concentrated there.

There are four major fashion capitals in the world: London, Milan, New York and Paris.

London

London has a long history as a trendsetter and leader in world fashion, and in recent years has been named as the number 1 fashion capital of the world thanks to the ascendency of Kate Middleton and the London Olympics. The vast majority of the international modelling agencies have their main UK offices in London and it is the base for hundreds of fashion photography studios and the supporting teams, including the best photographers for glossy magazines.

London’s fashion hub is located in Soho, in the centre of the city between Oxford Street and Picadilly Circus. This area is full of trendy shops and bars and has a bustling cosmopolitan atmosphere.

The major modelling agencies are mostly based in Central London, around South Kensington and Leicester Square, including: Elite, Storm, Premier Model Management, Models 1, BMA Models and Next Models.

Milan

In 2009 Milan was declared the top economic and media capital of fashion. There are a great many world famous Italian fashion brands which have their main headquarters located in the city, including: Valentino, Gucci, Versace, Prada, Armani and Dolce & Gabbana. Milan Fashion Week is held twice a year and is one of the Holy Grails for catwalk models.

New York

The only recognised fashion capital outside of Europe, New York is a metropolitan city that never sleeps and is home to the cutting edge of innovation is style and culture. New York Fashion Week, branded Mercedes-Benz FashionWeek in 2009 is held in February and September every year – and was originally the first ever fashion ‘week’.

Paris

Paris has a long standing history as a centre of art and fashion and is home to several prestigious fashion houses. It is known for the classic timeless elegance of the designs that are born there. It has an up market high fashion shopping district where all the most exclusive labels can be found.

Pointers on How to Become a Fashion Designer

How to become a fashion designer may seem like a glamorous proposition filled with promises of working in the world of clothing, accessories, runway models and photoshoots. But like all things in life, this isn’t as easy as it sounds. Only a handful of fashion designers really end up becoming famous, with their brand names known around the world, like Ralph Lauren or Alexander McQueen. The majority of fashion designers end up working for fashion brands that produce for the mass market, creating basic and ready-to-wear items.

If you really want to enter the fashion industry, here are some initial steps on how to become a fashion designer that will boost your chances of making it in this big, bad fashion world.

Know your abilities.

Do you have the artistic talent, creativity and imagination it takes to become a fashion designer? Have you tried a hand at sketching pieces that are unique and reflect your own style and personality? If all you can draw are stick people and you think that teal is something to drink, well then this may not be the best industry for you, especially if you want to be successful. Talents are innate, and if you find that you have a natural flair for colors, patterns, designs, symmetry and proportions, then this is your first weapon on how to become a fashion designer. Put together a portfolio of your work; this will not only be the key to an educational background, it will serve as your resume once you formally enter fashion.

Expand your horizons.

You will never be able to get to where you want if you stick to your comfort zone all the time. Branch out – take sewing or pattern-making courses, develop skills in design software programs, enroll in a fashion degree, go to trainings and seminars on the subject, even if it seems to be about something as simple as the history of buttons. Read fashion magazines, watch out for fashion shows you can go to, keep up with the current trends, browse the web for what’s in and what’s what in pop culture, what the controversies are in fashion and so on. This is all very important in how to become a fashion designer, because you’ll need to be constantly updated so that you know what you’re getting into and what the competition is like.

Make your connections.

Start your fashion career by getting an internship or any entry-level job related to the industry. Once you’re in, make as many connections as you can, from small to big. Don’t underestimate the power of who you know; even the mail-room boy might be able to help you in the future. Include connections in all possible areas of fashion, meaning don’t just stick to the more established designers and the bosses. Get to know the advertising and marketing team, the merchandise display and salespeople, the photographers and editors, and you’ll have a wide network of valuable names that will come in handy once you’ve managed to establish yourself. How to become a fashion designer isn’t an easy path, but like all dreams, with enough hard work, you’ll get there.

Fashion Design History Comes to Life at the Museo Della Moda in Milan

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

“A Shaded View on Fashion” is a touring event, and it will reach Milan after having run in Paris, Mexico City and Amsterdam. It will feature video and short films by photographers and visionary directors, including Nick Knight, Erwin Olaf, Chris Cunningham and Steven Klein, avant-garde fashion designers such as Undercover, Hussein Chalayan, Rick Owens, Mr. Pearl, Rodarte, Coming Soon/ Yohji Yamamoto, Gareth Pugh, Thom Browne, and many others. In addition, during the Milan stage of the festival, designs by young talents will be on show at the Museo della Moda from 25 to 30 May. A new series of short films dedicated to the theme of light will also be screened, along with a special video produced by Lancia Trend Visions (a new website involved in scouting for new forms of creativity, developed by Lancia) highlighting the creative duo Leitmotiv, one of the most experimental and art-oriented signatures on the fashion scene.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

“A Shaded View on Fashion” is a touring event, and it will reach Milan after having run in Paris, Mexico City and Amsterdam. It will feature video and short films by photographers and visionary directors, including Nick Knight, Erwin Olaf, Chris Cunningham and Steven Klein, avant-garde fashion designers such as Undercover, Hussein Chalayan, Rick Owens, Mr. Pearl, Rodarte, Coming Soon/ Yohji Yamamoto, Gareth Pugh, Thom Browne, and many others. In addition, during the Milan stage of the festival, designs by young talents will be on show at the Museo della Moda from 25 to 30 May. A new series of short films dedicated to the theme of light will also be screened, along with a special video produced by Lancia Trend Visions (a new website involved in scouting for new forms of creativity, developed by Lancia) highlighting the creative duo Leitmotiv, one of the most experimental and art-oriented signatures on the fashion scene.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

“A Shaded View on Fashion” is a touring event, and it will reach Milan after having run in Paris, Mexico City and Amsterdam. It will feature video and short films by photographers and visionary directors, including Nick Knight, Erwin Olaf, Chris Cunningham and Steven Klein, avant-garde fashion designers such as Undercover, Hussein Chalayan, Rick Owens, Mr. Pearl, Rodarte, Coming Soon/ Yohji Yamamoto, Gareth Pugh, Thom Browne, and many others. In addition, during the Milan stage of the festival, designs by young talents will be on show at the Museo della Moda from 25 to 30 May. A new series of short films dedicated to the theme of light will also be screened, along with a special video produced by Lancia Trend Visions (a new website involved in scouting for new forms of creativity, developed by Lancia) highlighting the creative duo Leitmotiv, one of the most experimental and art-oriented signatures on the fashion scene.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Lastly, “The Tirelli Collection, atelier costumes for cinema and theatre” presents the Tirelli dressmaking business and its work on cosumes. This show was curated by Oscar prize-winner Gabriella Pescucci. The Tirelli maison has won eight Oscars for its costumes, and has received another four nominations. These garments are absolutely spectacular to behold, and they are remarkable for their historical and philological accuracy.

This is a great start for the Museo della Moda, and there is more to come. On 8 April 2010 at 11.30 a.m., there will be a press conference for the launch of “A Shaded View on Fashion Film,” the first fashion film festival, created by Diane Pernet. The festival will run in Milan, from 25 to 30 May 2010. Michael Nyman will be present at the press conference, with the world premier screening of his only video with links to the world of fashion. It is ironically titled “The Cleaners wear Prada.”

“A Shaded View on Fashion” is a touring event, and it will reach Milan after having run in Paris, Mexico City and Amsterdam. It will feature video and short films by photographers and visionary directors, including Nick Knight, Erwin Olaf, Chris Cunningham and Steven Klein, avant-garde fashion designers such as Undercover, Hussein Chalayan, Rick Owens, Mr. Pearl, Rodarte, Coming Soon/ Yohji Yamamoto, Gareth Pugh, Thom Browne, and many others. In addition, during the Milan stage of the festival, designs by young talents will be on show at the Museo della Moda from 25 to 30 May. A new series of short films dedicated to the theme of light will also be screened, along with a special video produced by Lancia Trend Visions (a new website involved in scouting for new forms of creativity, developed by Lancia) highlighting the creative duo Leitmotiv, one of the most experimental and art-oriented signatures on the fashion scene.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

The show titled “Fashion details. The 1920s and 1930s in the Mangiameli collection” presents a historic collection donated to the Municipality of Milan by the Mangiameli sisters Anna, Lucia and Ninni. It comprises accessories, mainly bags, buckles and brooches, accumulated during the family’s work in the leatherware company founded by their father in 1928.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

On the first floor, there is an exhibition of paintings from the Luigi Beretta collection, purchased by the Municipality of Milan in 1934, along with actual garments dating from the 18th to the 20th centuries. The 22 halls of this section include an installation of garments within the setting of an 18th century aristocratic residence – exactly what Palazzo Morando once was.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

From 2 March 2010, four interesting shows on fashion design history ranging from 1800s fashion history right through to the latest urban fashions can be seen at Palazzo Morando (admission is free). On the ground floor is “The Thread of Dreams, Frette 2010-1860,” which presents an interesting portrait of the linen and textiles created by this maison. The Frette Historic Archive is the most important in the world for jacquard textiles, and the show is particularly interesting for its demonstration of how a fashion textile is created, from concept to industrial implementation. There are many examples of personalization, with emblems, crests and logos for various institutional clients.

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fashion district, close to Via Montenapoleone. The municipal advisor for Culture, Massimiliano Finazzer Flory, said that rather than being just a museum, the space is “a venue involved in research into visual design and the promotion of a young and fresh image of Fashion” (Municipality of Milan press release).

Fashion design history is brought to life by Palazzo Morando, on Via Sant’Andrea 6, Milan, Italy. This lovely Renaissance building was restored a few years ago, and this work uncovered an interesting frieze at the top of the façade. The municipal authorities intelligently decided to use this space for a Fashion Museum, something that is absolutely necessary in one of the world’s fashion capitals. Palazzo Morando is right at the heart of Milan’s top fas